Ancestors and Descendants of Gappa Malachi Rushing

Dan,
 
I enjoyed the conversation.  I have attached the picture.  Here is some of the info:
 
Rushing, Mathew of Beaufort District, SC

 

My 4th ggrandfather, Mathew Rushing, was born about 1760 in Beaufort District, South Carolina.  We think that he was the son of William Rushing, b. about 1710 in Northampton Co., NC, who married Elizabeth (unknown) in Anson Co. NC about 1744 and who migrated down to Beaufort and later, after 1785, died in Effingham Co. GA, just across the Savannah River from Beaufort.

In 1783 or 1784 Mathew married Elizabeth Thornhill, born 1770, also in Beaufort District.  He served in the Revolutionary war and is on record with the Sons of the American Revolution.   Mathew and Elizabeth had six children of which I am aware.  The second son, Malachi, born in Beaufort about 1792, was my 3rd ggrandfather.   In 1816 Malachi married Teletha Dykes, born in 1793 in Beaufort, and in 1818 they migrated to what is now Montgomery, Alabama, building the third house in Montgomery.   They had nine children, the 5th of which, born on 5 January 1832, was my 2nd ggrandfather, Francis Marion Rushing, named after the South Carolina Revolutionary War patriot.

 Notes for Francis Marion Rushing

by Ronald D. Bridges  <bridgesrd@knology.net>

 

His mother died when he was seven years old and his father died a few years later.

When Francis Marion was twelve years old, being an orphan, he and a brother went to Pike County where he lived with an uncle until he was sixteen years old. He worked on the farm and attended school in the winter.

Becoming dissatisfied with his lot, he began life for himself, working on a farm and attending school as he had means. He succeeded in obtaining a fair education and taught school for a while. In 1855 he became clerk in the office of Probate Judge, P. D. Costello, continuing in this place until 1857, when became clerk in a store and at the same time read medicine with Doctors J. P. Blue and J. G. Moore.

In 1859 he married Fannie V. Yelverton, born Wednesday, 19 April 1843, daughter of Judge Gappa T. Yelverton and Martha B. Yelverton, who came from George to Alabama, finally locating in Elba.

In 1861 Francis Marion graduated from the Medical Department of the University of Louisiana, and he practiced at Elba until 1862. He enlisted as a Private on Tuesday, 8 April 1862 and was made surgeon of the 25th Alabama, Company K, and spent some months at Corinth, MS. He re-enlisted in September 1863 at Elba, AL in Captain Brown's Company of Home Guards and continued service until May 1863, when his health forced him to resign. He was given an honorable discharge. He then returned to Bullock, Geneva County, AL, and practiced his profession until 1863.

His health improving, he joined the home guard and served at Pollard; Pensacola, FL and other places, taking part in several battles and skirmishes in that area. He was tendered a surgeon's position but refused, preferring to serve as a soldier. After the war, Doctor Rushing returned to Elba to continue his practice.

While a practicing physician, Judge Rushing was a member of the State Medical Association. He was one of the counselors for six years and president for some time of the Coffee County Medical Society.

Dr. Rushing was active in the county affairs and was elected to the Legislature in 1878, and in 1880 to the State Senate from Coffee, Henry, Dale, and Geneva Counties, during which time he introduced several measures that became law.

In August 1892, he was elected Probate Judge of Coffee County and re-elected in 1898, serving all twelve years.

When Judge Rushing and his County Commissioners took charge of the court affairs, the total county taxes were around $8000.00. The Tax Assessor's Abstract for 1893 showed a total of $7, 685.90. On 15 May 1895, a committee was appointed to examine the books of the treasurer. J. M. Sanders reported the sum of $1,666.78 in the treasury. Judge Rushing began to make some improvements during this first term in office and in 1895, a contract was made with the Converse Bridge Company to build two steel bridges in Elba, across the Pea River and White Water Creek. During his first and second terms, seven bridges were constructed over these streams. Improvements were made on the county jail and courthouse. A special tax of 1/20th of one per cent was levied for this purpose in July 1895. In August 1895, the Commissioners Court contracted with the Pauley Jail Company for the price of $3000.00 payable in five years, giving notes of $600.00, each bearing eight per cent interest.

Judge Rushing's administration will stand out prominently for years to come on account of three things: first the construction of several steel bridges; second, the building of a new courthouse; and third, for the establishment of a home for county paupers.

Dr. Rushing was president of the Board of the Board of Censors of the Medical Society of Coffee County in 1885. Composing this Board of Censors were doctors F. M. Rushing, W. H. Chapman, J. W. Garrett, J. D. Blue and Ben A. Hill.

Dr. Rushing was at the time of his election as Probate Judge, a prominent and highly honored member of his chosen profession of medicine. He perhaps treated more people in Coffee County than any of his contemporaries in the profession and he was universally popular.

He was a Mason, having joined the Elba Lodge No. 170 A. F. & A. M. in 1857. At the time of his death, he was the oldest member of the Elba Lodge.

Francis Marion and Fannie V. (Yelverton) Rushing had eight children. Fannie died 24 July 1877 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Elba, (AL). Daughter Francis served as mother and father of their children until his death 14 May 1912. He is also buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Elba. (AL)

 

From the book "Rushing" Through the Generations, by Peggy Rushing Sims:

 

Francis M. Rushing, M. D., physician and surgeon, at Elba, was born in Montgomery county, Ala., in 1833. He is a son of Malachi and Telitha (Dykes) Rushing, natives of Beaufort district, S. C., the former born in 1792, the latter a few years later. They were both liberally educated, married in their native state, and in 1818 removed to Montgomery county, Ala., when there were but two houses in Montgomery. They located first on the prairie and then moved to Dublin in the piney woods, where they both died when Francis M. was a little boy, the mother when he was seven years old, the father a few years later. Mr. Rushing was a farmer, and served a short time in the war of 1812, as a substitute for his brother. His father, Matthew Rushing, was probably born and died in South Carolina, but his mother came to Alabama and died in Pike county. Grandfather Dykes died in South Carolina when the mother of Francis M. was a little girl. Francis M. Rushing was the sixth of a family of six sons and one daughter: Thomas A., died when a young man; Baron DeKalb, now of Know Hill, Fla., was a sergeant in the Thirty-third Alabama regiment during the late war; Stephen Dykes Decatur, died in Texas after the war, having served in the Eighth Alabama; William McDonough died in Texas after the war; Andrew J. died when a young man; Rebecca, his sister, died when a young lady. When Francis Marion was twelve years old, being an orphan, he and a brother went to Pike county, Ala. He lived with an uncle until he was sixteen years old, working on the farm and attended school in the winter time. Becoming dissatisfied with his lot, he began life for himself, working on a farm and attending school as he had means. He succeeded in obtaining a fair education, and in 1855 he became clerk in the office of Probate Judge, P. D. Costello, continuing in this place until 1857, when he became clerk in a store and at the same time read medicine with Drs. J. P. Blue and J. G. Moore. In 1861 he graduated from the Medical Department of the University of Louisiana, and he practiced at Elba until 1862, when he was made surgeon of the Twenty-fifth Alabama (Company K), and spent some months at Corinth, Miss. His health failing, he resigned and returned home, and practiced his profession at Bullock until 1863, when he joined the home guards and served as first lieutenant at Pollard, Pensacola, and other places, participating in several minor battles and skirmishes. In 1859 he married Fannie V. Yelverton, daughter of Judge Gappa T. Yelverton, who came from George to Alabama, finally locating in Elba, where Judge Yelverton is buried; Mrs. Yelverton is still living. Judge Yelverton waa a prominent attorney and was a member of the legislature. He was also county judge of Dale and Coffee counties, and was a commissioner to Florida to negotiate for the transfer of West Florida to Alabama. He was also a member of the secession convention. He raised a regiment for service in the late war, but was not called into active service. Mrs. Rushing was born in Montgomery county, and died in 1877. She was a member of the Baptist church, and the mother of four sons and four daughters, viz.: Martha A., wife of John B. Harper, of Geneva; William M.; John B.; Grappa M., a physician at Nevada, Texas, a graduate of Mobile Medical college; Fannie M.; Tupp; Delia, and Minneola. Dr. Rushing is one of the oldest and most prominent physicians of Coffee county, and is both well and favorably known. He is a member of the State Medical association; and has been one of the counselors for six years, and is president of Coffee County Medical society. In 1878 he was elected to the legislature, and in 1880 to the senate from Coffee, Henry, Dale and Geneva counties. He introduced several measures that became laws. In August, 1892, he was elected probate judge of Coffee county, Ala., without seeking the office. Since then he as been retired form politics. He has been a Mason since 1857, and is a member of Elba lodge, No. 170, A. F. & A. M. He has some farming interest, is popular with his people and is in all respects a self-made and successful man. (1) Memorial Records of Alabama, Volume I, pp. 679-681. Located in Archives and History of Alabama, Montgomery, AL.

 

Fannie M. the daughter listed above, was Francis Miriam Rushing, my ggrandmother.  Born in Elba, Coffee Co. AL on 26 September 1871, on 22 October 1894 she married William Washington Ham, born 25 January 1874, also in Coffee County, Alabama.   Bill Ham was the son of  Phillip Jefferson Ham and Maryann Carroll and the grandson of Revolutionary War veterans.   Fannie and Bill Ham were married for 65 years until her death on  22 July 1959 when I was 18 years old.  Grandaddy Ham died two years later.   I was born in 1941 and spent most of my youth in the home of Granny and Grandaddy Ham, who I loved very much.  The attached picture was taken about 1930 and is of three of Francis Marion and Fannie Rushing's children;

 

Left:  Minneola Rushing, b. 1878, Coffee Co. AL, d. 1958, Elba, Coffee Co. AL, married Pierre Liebert.

Middle:  Dr. Gappa Malachi Rushing, b. 16 Feb 1868, Coffee Co. AL, d. 1931, Nevada, TX.

Right:  Frances Miriam Rushing, b. 26 Sep 1871, Coffee Co. AL, d. 22 Jul 1959, Elba, Coffee Co. AL, married William Washington Ham.

 

 

Thanks much Dan.  You are welcome to edit this as you wish.

 

Frederick N. "Rick" Boswell
 
 

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EXSURGEMUS!

Rick Boswell